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Carmen

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Reply with quote  #1 

Seem to recall a recipe for an anti-dandruff rinse which uses apple cider vinegar and wild thyme. Does anyone know the exact quantities? I have been using just ACV as a rinse for quite sometime and have found it good in combating the flakes but just doesn't seem to get rid of all of it and the commercial shampoos are useless. Thanks in advance...

Carolyn

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Reply with quote  #2 

Hey Carmen - the generally accepted % concentration for use in aromatherapy products is usually between 2 - 5% - according to Tisserand & Balacs, Essential Oil Safety - but then you'll find variations on this depending on the nature of the eo used (therapeutic margin), route of administration, condition of the skin if to be used dermally, constitution of the recipient, and desired objectives of the administration. Martin Watt for example suggests 9 drops in total of eo - 5 of tea tree and 4 of lavender - in 10mls of carrier, and in this case he suggests comfrey extract. He also lists the maximum recommended amount for a hair/scalp oil as being 25 drops in 30 ml of carrier oil. Alcohol can increase the potential absorption of certain eo components into the stratum corneum - and some lipid soluble eo components may penetrate more rapidly via the hair follicle. It may also be that Cider vinegar aids penetration of some of the eo components too, although I have no direct evidence for this conjecture. There's a general consensus of opinnion that it's permissable - always taking careful consideration of the potential irritant/sensitization/therapeutic margin of the eo's to be used and balancing accordingly - to increase the concentration of eo to carrier if being used on a localized basis. Wild thyme - I'm presuming you mean 'serpolet' which is known as Thymus serpyllum by the French, and also known as a red thyme contains higher levels of the phenols, thymol and/or carvacrol and so can be irritant to the skin. There are a number of factors involved and so you might like to do a patch test to check the best concentration for you. You might also like to consider using the Thymus vulgaris ct linalool - the sweet thyme - which contains the same range of components but has a higher level of the stimulating yet less potentially irritating alcohol linalool and much lower levels of the phenols proportionally. Smells wonderful too. Hope this helps. Best Carolyn

Carolyn

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Reply with quote  #3 

Oh and I forgot to tell you that according to Kurt Schnaubelt - amongst others - Spikenard is one of the only eo's which has any effect against dandruff. You might like to blend it with something sweeter however since spikenard is an acquired taste olfactorily. Also if you take the very broad generalization that one drop of eo - i.e. an eo with medium mobility = 0.05ml, then 1 ml = 20 drops. So using this very general equation we can work out the recommended concentrations Kurt Schnaubelt suggests as being appropriate for various skin conditions - although he has nothing directly for dandruff. For example he suggests 5 mls (which = 100 drops) in 15 mls of carrier - containing oragano, thyme, thymol type and cinnamon (bark I presume) to combat fungal skin infections. So this should give you an idea of how wide the accepted range of eo concentration is for various skin administrations. Best Carolyn

Carmen

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Reply with quote  #4 

Thank you , Carolyn for the quick response. What would you suggest as a carrier? I would love to take formal schooling in aromatherapy but wasn't a particularly strong student in high school.

Carolyn

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Reply with quote  #5 

As well as possibly enhancing the potential absorption of various active ingredients, the use of an alcohol base has a distinct advantage from an 'appearance' perspective so you can treat your scalp without slapping oil or grease on your hair - and I might think that cider vinegar might offer similar advantages. Remember however that there are a wide range of variable factors that influence the potential absorption of eo components - such as pH gradients, time left in contact with the skin, condition of the skin & blood supply, molecular attraction or repulsion to aqueous or lipid environments, concentration gradients and so on. You might also like to try Aloe Vera gel as part of your base for it's anti-inflammative and moisturizing properties. However, it seems that the best medium for active ingredients is an emulsion - which is a combination of water and lipid held together with an emulsifier - that provides the best of both worlds. Check out Donna Maria's lotions and creams book for some very simple recipes to make your own emulsions - although I'd prefer a spritzer for my hair I must say. Add about 5% eo's to your base of water, alcohol and Aloe vera. Don't forget that Auroma has an excellent range of fragrance-free and naturally preserved personal care products - such as the shampoo and conditioner that should make the base of your treatment. Again add up to 5% eo's to these - which works out at 15 drops in total of eo's to a tablespoon of base. You can make up a whole bottle-full in advance if you're happy with your eo blend, or simply use the palm-mixing method. Pre-blend your eo's in the proportions you want neat, and then add 2-3 drops or so of this 'Mother Blend' to each handful of shampoo and conditioner. Best Carolyn

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